I notice little things are changing for me.  Like I say Padova, which is the Italian instead of the English, Padua.  And I don’t push the light switches the wrong way–they’re totally counter intuitive for Americans–down is on; up is off.  I automatically push the doors going inside instead of doing the little pull/push dance I was doing a few weeks ago.  I’m really getting comfortable here.

Anyway….We set this day up with a reservation for the Scrovegni Chapel in Padova.  Painted by Giotto in 1305, the frescoed walls are a masterpiece, which marked the beginning of the Renaissance.  (One simple sentence doesn’t really make a good explanation.)

Our train was leaving Venice at 11:12 so we had plenty of time to stop for coffee at the always crowded Torrefazione on Strada Nuova.  Their coffee really is great.  Arriving a bit early, we walked over the Scalzi bridge to take in the clear morning view:

I never tire of these Grand Canal views!

I never tire of these Grand Canal views!

The train ride was less than 30 minutes and I was able to practice my Italian with a young woman who sat across from us.  We walked straight into town from the station and turned left into the park, and out of the park.  We realized we had somehow missed the chapel.  Google maps to the rescue and we were there in 2 minutes.  We had to wait for a while for our time slot, so we sat outside and looked at the modern sculpture garden there.img_3665

Beautiful spent hydrangea in front of the Cappella

Beautiful spent hydrangea in front of the Cappella

Before you can enter, in groups of no more than 25 people, you must sit in a room to wait and watch a short video while they “acclimatize the space,”  which is part of the preservation efforts for the work.  The frescoes are stunning, especially in historical context.  I really noticed the fake (painted)  marble panels and small work framing the story panels.  We both wished we knew the new testament better in order to follow the story.

For lunch we chose L’Anforna where we had gone 6 years ago and enjoyed.  The scene there was still great–all dark and Greenwich Village like with jazz references all over the walls.  But the food was not so great.  I had pork and Ken had Amatriciana, both a C+, but the exciting thing was the vegetable with the pork. It was scorzonero, black salsify.  I had never eaten it before.  It looks like a thin white carrot but the flavor is totally unique and earthy.  Worth eating the other average stuff just to taste this!

We walked back to the train station really rushing by so many interesting sights.  It was cold.

shadow

shadow

side street

side street

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

But it was cold and windy so walking fast kept us warm.

By 5:00, we were back in the apartment and neither of us wanted to go out again. The sunset light was so warm, visually, from our windows. We ate the last of the polenta and sauce and I cooked some zucchini and onions.  I fell asleep super early, my feet aching, feeling a bit worn out.

 

 


Comments

Padova or Padua — 4 Comments

  1. Jan the pen is your friend. You have a gift in your ability to share even the simplest experiences in an enticing manner. Your words captivate and pull me in. I feel as though I walk beside you, see what you see and taste what you taste. Reading your posts are addictive. You keep me wanting more. I think you have a book in you! Grazie so enjoyable.

  2. Dear Jan, I have loved traveling with you
    this year! But today’s blog is near and dear
    to my heart! I desperately wanted to sit
    next to you in Scrovegni Chapel and share
    With you what I know of these beautiful
    frescoes in Padua! Madeleine L’engle’s
    beautiful book, The Glorious Impossible
    made the Birth of Jesus explainable.
    Her narrative, using the frescoes as
    illustrations is a love story that gives
    voice to the miracle of God’s love for us! I would
    Suggest you try to find this book and go
    back to the Chapel and enjoy these paintings
    in a new way. Copyright 1990 by Crosswicks Ltd.
    This is a book for children. My cherished book
    About the birth of Christ.

  3. I notice the same acclamations that you do, and there comes a point when I realize I am 💭 ng in Italian and translating it back tomEnglishnrather Han the other way around. We had a walking tour if Padova with a guide who was very boring and indifferent until we reached the Scrovegni Chapel. Then she turned into an animated, informative, storytelling, fact filled delight. It was amazing experience. At that time we were allowed only 15 or 20 minutes, but they were only just constructing the rooms which were supposed to sanitize us so we would not pollute the air in the chapel. We always talked about returning but never made it so thank you for this lively visit. Never had black salsify, and would not have expected it to be white – sounds like a good I would enjoy.

  4. Hey gurl! Just now getting over jet lag and a bit of a cold. Really laid low this week. Finally caught up with your blogs after we left. Kudos to you and kenny for the most delightful experience in Venice! Y’all were so accommodating and gracious to us. Thank you so much for your love and tour guiding. hugs to all! Linda